Climate Change and Science Communication Paper Published

A new paper explores strategies for communicating about climate change. Building off experiences in Canada, the paper, Seven Strategies of Climate Change Science Communication for Policy Change: Combining Academic Theory with Practical Evidence from Science–Policy Partnerships in Canada, provides tested science communication strategies. From the paper’s abstract:

“Climate science communicators would benefit from a synthesized list of messaging strategies that is accessible and practical, but still supported by robust theory. We conducted interviews with participants in partnerships between climate scientists and climate policy makers in Canada. This revealed a number of favoured messaging techniques, which we then analyzed through the lens of communication theory (based on a combination of relevant literatures). The result is a set of seven ready-to-use science–policy messaging strategies vetted both empirically and theoretically.”

The paper is published in the Handbook of Climate Change Communication: Vol. 2, part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM).

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-70066-3_11

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Reproducible analysis with R Training Anchorage, May 17-18

The State of Alaska’s Salmon and People (SASAP) project is holding a short course on practical skills in open and reproducible science May 17-18, 2018 in Anchorage at the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center. The course will target statisticians, researchers, and students from multiple organizations, including UA, ADF&G, NOAA, among others.

Title: Reproducible analysis with R

When: May 17-18, 2018

Where: Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center (Downtown Anchorage)

Info: https://nceas.github.io/sasap-training/

This event will cover techniques for building reproducible analysis workflows using the R programming language through a series of hands-on coding sessions. We will cover topics in data science, including reproducible analysis, version control, data modeling, cleaning, and integration, and data visualization both for publications and the web. Familiarity with R is a prerequisite.

Agenda and registration are online: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1RRL67-8vXVa0Ee47qMvePDn5H87Z740ZI9slMVw674k/edit#responses

Space is limited, so please register early.

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Webinar Rescheduled: Evaluating large-scale collaborative conservation over time: application of social network analysis in the Northwest Boreal

The analysis describes relationships among agencies, researchers,and other stakeholders across Alaska and Canada.

Title: Evaluating large-scale collaborative conservation over time: application of social network analysis in the Northwest Boreal.

Presenter: Patrick Bixler, Research Assistant Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin

Date: Tuesday, May 1, 2018, 12 -1 PM Alaska Time

Webinar Access:

Meeting Link: https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m36b554dbef55e32d448f9488718d262e

Meeting number: 745 706 784
Meeting password: fV5frPW@

Phone:

Call-in toll-free number: 1-866-755-3168
Attendee access code: 402 119 14

In person meeting rooms:

Anchorage –FWS Regional Office, Science Applications Conference Room
Fairbanks –Federal Building, 101 12th Ave., Room 110, Library

Summary:

Solving complex conservation challenges at scale requires building and sustaining relationships over long periods of time. Strategies to evaluate the impact of large-scale conservation interventions across space and time, while critical, are nascent and fragmented. This research reports on a three-year research project with a large-scale collaborative conservation effort in the Northwest Boreal region of Alaska, British Columbia, and the Yukon Territory. Social network analysis is used to track changes in the network topology and the results of this research point toward a multi-dimensional set of social network analysis metrics for evaluating collaborative conservation.

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2018 Spring Alaska Fire Science Workshop Scheduled

2018 Spring Alaska Fire Science Workshop is scheduled for March 28, 2018.

Details:
2018 Spring Alaska Fire Science Workshop
Half-day workshop in association with the Interagency Spring FMO meeting
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Alaska Fire Service, 1300-1700

The agenda is available at the Alaska Fire Science Consortium website.

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2018 Alaska Society of American Foresters Annual Meeting Scheduled for April in Fairbanks

The ANFC is holding its annual meeting in conjunction with the Alaska Society of American Foresters meeting this April 12-14, 2018 in Fairbanks, Alaska. Online registration and the draft agenda are now available. The deadline to take advantage of the lower early registration rate is March 16.

The meeting theme is focused on developing carbon markets for forested lands in Alaska.

http://www.alaska.forestry.org/content/2018-alaska-saf-annual-meeting

2018 Alaska SAF and Alaska Northern Forest Cooperative Annual Meeting
April 12-14, 2018
Pike’s Waterfront Lodge, 1850 Hoselton Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska

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Alaska Landscape Connectivity Article Published

The connectivity analysis explores using “enduring features” to understand potential connectivity in the future.

NWB LCC collaborators have published an article about connectivity modelling across Alaska, focused on the BLM’s Central Yukon Planning area. The article, Using topographic geodiversity to connect conservation lands in the Central Yukon, Alaska, is published in the journal Landscape Ecology. The analysis models climate-resilient landscape linkages between conservation lands within and adjacent to a 59-million-acre planning area. The authors found that using as little as 1% of the planning area linkages can connect over 64 million acres of conservation land.

“Once connectivity is lost, it is politically and financially difficult to restore (Forman 1995). Alaska has > 120 million acres of land in the federal conservation estate. Proactively linking these conservation units will allow for wildlife movement even as the region develops and land use changes (Beier et al. 2008).

We used geodiversity to design structural connectivity between approximately 55 million acres of National Park Service (NPS) and National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) lands in Northern Alaska. We use the term landscape linkage to describe structural corridors between the conservation units. The term linkage has been defined as specific lands that maintain the ability of multiple species to move between wildland blocks (Beier et al. 2008).”

You can read the article here.

Authors: Dawn R. Magness Amanda L. Sesser Tim Hammond

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Webinar – Documenting Local Knowledge of Changing Wildlife Habitats and Adaptive Considerations of Large Land Mammal Hunters to the Effects of Climate Change in Alaska Game Management Units 9B-C, 17, 18, and 19A-C

Photo courtesy of James Van Lanen, ADF&G.

Webinar:Title: Documenting Local Knowledge of Changing Wildlife Habitats and Adaptive Considerations of Large Land Mammal Hunters to the Effects of Climate Change in Alaska Game Management Units 9B-C, 17, 18, and 19A-C

Presenter: James Van Lanen, Subsistence Resource Specialist, Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6th; 12 -1 PM Alaska Time
Anchorage –FWS Regional Office, Science Applications Conference Room
Fairbanks –Federal Building, Refuges Conference Room

Webinar Access:
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mdcdc5d674be76d0c9bb58773baa05557
Meeting number: 743 408 766
Meeting password: wGWrgH*3

Phone:

Call-in toll-free number: 1-866-755-3168
Attendee access code: 402 119 14

Summary:

Participatory landscape mapping is an effective method for documenting geospatially specific local ecological knowledge of changing wildlife habitats and environmental conditions. This presentation will highlight results from a recent Western Alaska LCC-funded project focused on mapping local knowledge of caribou behavior dynamics in relation to ecological change in Alaska Game Management Units 9B-C, 17, 18, and 19A-C, over the course of five decades. The primary adaptive considerations of subsistence large land mammal hunters facing changing environmental conditions are access and prey-switching. Human-large-land-mammal-subsistence-system resilience depends on hunters being flexible in regards to access methods and targeted prey species and on resource managers flexibly adapting legal hunting seasons to times when local travel conditions are optimal.

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New Study Documents Yukon Salmon Spawning Areas Across Alaska and Canada

The study documents salmon spawning streams all along the Yukon River drainage.

A new study by Alaska and Canada-based researchers catalogs and maps the known spawning areas of Yukon River Chinook Salmon. The researchers use published articles, gray literature, and information archived in agency databases. The authors write that most of the sources are from the past three decades, but some reference observations that were recorded as long ago as the late 1800s.

“Despite the long history of Chinook Salmon research and management within the Yukon River basin (Pennoyer et al. 1965; Evenson et al. 2009; JTC 2016), there is no comprehensive account of spawning areas in tributary rivers and main-stem reaches. Our primary objective in this study was therefore to document and map Chinook Salmon spawning areas throughout the Yukon River basin by using a wide range of data sources. Our secondary objective was to highlight the largest populations by classifying spawning areas as either major or minor producers based on three indicators of abundance…”

The article, Catalog of Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas in Yukon River Basin in Canada and United States is published in the Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management.

Authors:

Randy J. Brown,* Al von Finster, Robert J. Henszey, John H. Eiler
R.J. Brown, R.J. Henszey

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Webinar Recording: ShoreZone 101: How to Use the ShoreZone Coastal Imagery and Mapping Dataset

ShoreZone is a coastal imaging and habitat mapping system that has been applied to most of Alaska’s coast as well as those of British Columbia, Washington State and Oregon. This dataset is publicly available. Learn how the imagery and mapping is completed, see a live demonstration of how to access the data online and view examples of numerous and varied ways the data has been utilized. Uses include: oil spill planning and response, risk management, species and habitat modelling, marine debris mapping, cultural features mapping, research study design and outreach and education. ShoreZone imagery is also being used create digital elevation models and change detection using Structure from Motion technology.

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New Research Tracks Snowy Owls Across Canada and Alaska

Frank Doyle releases a Snowy Owl. Photo by Alistair Blachford.

A new study describes the movements of breeding snowy owls across Northwest Canada and Alaska over the course of their seasonal movements.

From authors Frank Doyle, Jean-François Therrien, Donald Reid, Gilles Gauthier and Charles Krebs:

“The authors were intrigued to discover that these owls spent winter in the north, not on the tundra, but in the mountainous regions of the boreal forest zone of Alaska and northern Yukon. This is the first telemetry study of Snowy Owls showing that they can winter in boreal forest latitudes. They chose particularly open, unforested habitats, such as subalpine taiga shrub lands and extensive wetlands, with lots of openings. Over most of the boreal forest biome these relatively open habitats are uncommon, so the mountains themselves are probably key to this result.

In winter, relatively few people live in these mountainous boreal regions, which included Denali National Park and the Yukon River Flats. Although the authors were not able to visit the wintering areas when the birds were there, they did get information from biologists and other people working in these regions, and suspect that these Snowy Owls were moving in search of high abundance of snowshoe hares and ptarmigan. There is still much to be learned about how the Owls get through this season.”

The research, “Seasonal Movements of Female Snowy Owls Breeding in the Western North American Arctic,” is published this month in the Journal of Raptor Research.

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