Webinar: Identifying Climate Vulnerabilities and Prioritizing Adaptation Strategies for Eulachon Populations in Southeast Alaska

Identifying Climate Vulnerabilities and Prioritizing Adaptation Strategies for Eulachon Populations in Southeast Alaska

Meredith Pochardt, Takshanuk Watershed Council

Hooligan (Eulachon or Saak), a small anadromous smelt species, have been a culturally significant subsistence species for the Tlingit people for generations. Declines in the southern distinct populations (SDP) located in California, Oregon and Washington and their eventual listing as Threatened in 2010 promoted the Chilkoot Indian Association (CIA) and the Takshanuk Watershed Council (TWC) to being a long-term population monitoring program in northern Southeast Alaska. Prior to these efforts that began in 2010 there was little to no hooligan population data for this region. The CIA and TWC began with a mark-recapture protocol on the Chilkoot river. In 2014 the CIA and TWC partnered with Oregon State University to integrate the use of environmental DNA (eDNA) as an alternative method to collect population data. In 2017 this research expanded to 8 additional rivers in northern Southeast Alaska. The goal is to determine the applicability of various population estimation methods and determine the most cost-effective method to gather data in remote locations.

Join us:

Anchorage: US Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office, 1011 E. Tudor Rd., Engineering Conference Room
Fairbanks: US Fish & Wildlife Service Field Office, 101 12th Ave., Refuges Conference Room
Online:

Audio
Call-in number: 1-866-755-3168
Access code: 402 119 14#

Webex
Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m29528b34f3da78bd51e8a78bd261ac6a
Meeting number: 747 732 899
Meeting Passcode: GpNxKS$3

Contact Brett_Parks@fws.gov [(907)456-0404] with any questions.

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Webinar: Living with wildland fires: What we learned from the 2016 Horse River Wildfire

Webinar Tuesday, November 21:
Living with wildland fires: What we learned from the 2016 Horse River Wildfire

Mike Flannigan, Canadian Partnership for Wildland Fire Science
and University of Alberta

Cordy Tymstra, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry
1000-1100 AKST

Fire happens in Canada’s forest. Every year, thousands of small fires and dozens of large ones occur somewhere in Canada’s vast forest landscape. It has been the story for centuries and will continue. Now more than ever people work, build and live in the boreal forest, but disaster can occur when people and fire intersect. This was the case in 2016 in Fort McMurray, resulting in unprecedented evacuation of 90,000 people, insurable losses over $3.7 billion and a negative impact on National GDP.

What have we learned from this catastrophic fire and can we co-exist with fire?
Visit akfireconsortium.uaf.edu to register

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Webinar: Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool

The tool allows users to search by keyword and geography to find research across the boreal.

The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative is pleased to announce the launch of the Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool.

Explore thousands of curated scholarly articles, state and federal resource reports, land management plans, and more. Each entry includes geographic information about the area of study, allowing users to draw a box on a map to narrow searches to information directly related to a specific region in Alaska, the Yukon, British Columbia, and Northwest Territories.

https://aknwc.databasin.org/sciencebase

Presenters:
Ben Matheson, NWB LCC
Susan Klein, ARLIS
Ryan Toohey, Alaska Climate Science Center

This project is a collaboration among Alaska Resources Library & Information Services (ARLIS) , Alaska Climate Science Center, DataBasin, and Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
Images: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/0Bw7I-HUID-uBWUYxYWpJclBESjA

Partners:

Alaska Resources Library & Information Services (ARLIS)
Alaska Resources Library and Information Services
DataBasin
USGS Alaska Climate Science Center

Additional funding acknowledgements:
USGS Alaska Science Center
USGS Student Interns in Support of Native American Relations (SISNAR)

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Register for Pacific Northwest Tribal First Nations Climate Summit

Tribal Councils, committees, administrators, department directors, managers, staff, and citizens of Tribes and First Nations are invited to attend:

Tribal / First Nations Climate Change Summit

Wednesday, December 13, 2017 at 8:00 AM PST
-to-
Thursday, December 14, 2017 at 5:00 PM PST

Tulalip Resort Casino
10200 Quil Ceda Blvd
Marysville, WA 98271

About:

Tribes and First Nations in the Pacific Northwest have made great progress in observing and documenting environmental change on their homelands, but climate change is increasing at a pace that challenges important ways of life. So Tribes and First Nations across the region are coming together to learn from past work and to discuss how to continue climate change studies to provide the support communities need to adapt and thrive for generations to come. This summit is being led by Tribes and First Nations for Tribal leadership and their staff.

Register Now!

Who Should Attend?

Tribal elected and appointed leaders, resource managers, health specialists, traditional elders, scientists, students and practitioners will discuss current issues along four Summit Tracks:

Traditional Knowledge – Exploring the role of traditional knowledges in respectfully and appropriately addressing contemporary environmental change

Cultural Resources – Revealing experience on the land by discussing the shifting ranges and calendars of important resources

Becoming Resilient – Assessing vulnerability to environmental change and moving ahead with plans and adaptation actions

Advancing Policy – Identifying effective policy strategies to continue studying our environments and plan for a resilient future

Agenda

Scholarship Request: 2017 Tribal & First Nations Climate Summit
IMPORTANT!!! Fill out this form ONLY if you are requesting a scholarship to help pay for costs related to the conference.

Registration Fees:

Full Summit Rate: $100 per attendee

Elder/Youth full Summit rate (under 18 and 65 or older with ID): No cost per attendee
Student Summit rate (with verification of enrollment or current class schedule): No cost per attendee
To access the discounted registration fees, you must provide a promo code at registration. To receive the appropriate promo code, please contact Peggy Harris at peggy@seventhgenerationllc.com

Contact:

Peggy Harris
Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians
541-215-2919
atni@atnitribes.org

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Webinar Recording- Building a Better Bird Map: Audubon Alaska’s 2017 Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas

Max Goldman, Marine Ecologist For Audubon Alaska

The Ecological Atlas of the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas is a comprehensive, trans-boundary atlas that represents the current state of knowledge in a wide breadth of relevant Arctic marine domains centered around the North Pacific Arctic, ranging from physical oceanography to species ecology to human uses. Our process involves intensive research and consultation with experts, as well as gathering and analyzing the most recent and robust data available.

The resulting maps integrate disparate datasets of points, tracks, or polygons into a few cohesive and complementary data layers that serve to visually describe a particular process or species’ activity and movements through the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. We will introduce some of our maps and discuss our process from identifying our audience, to intensive data gathering and syntheses, through the cartographic process where the story is solidified and visualized.

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Webinar: Mapping the Human Footprint Across the Boreal

The project brings together data from across Alaska and Canada. Map by ACCS.

Webinar: Mapping the Human Footprint Across the Boreal

Marcus Geist, Alaska Center for Conservation Science

The Alaska Center for Conservation Science (ACCS) at the University of Alaska Anchorage, in partnership with the Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NWB LCC), embarked on a project to map and quantify the human footprint across interior Alaska and northwestern Canada.

The goal was to build a seamless dataset that spanned international boundaries by stitching source information from state, provincial and territorial entities in order to represent landscape intactness in the boreal ecosystem. This dataset, which focuses primarily on historical mining, oil and gas, and transportation infrastructure, could help inform decisions regarding natural resource monitoring, identifying potential mitigation/restoration sites, and for conservation planning at watershed scales.

Details:

Wednesday, Oct. 4; 12 -1 PM Alaska Time
Anchorage – FWS Regional Office, Science Applications Conference Rm.
Fairbanks – Federal Building Rm. 110 (Library)

Webinar:

Audio:
Call-in number: 1-866-755-3168
Access code: 402 119 14#

Direct Link:
https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m46abb40dcfe9ba8398104d7f02d6ed8b

Go to MyMeetings.com
Meeting number: 744 174 411
Meeting Passcode: cSKRtc?8

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Upcoming Webinar: Assessment of the Application of Climate Information in Wildfire Management in Alaska: Experiences from the Alaska Fire Science Consortium

A webinar will be held on October 24th examining how the Alaska Fire Science Consortium contributes to fire management in Alaska.

Assessment of the Application of Climate Information in Wildfire Management in Alaska: Experiences from the Alaska Fire Science Consortium

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking:
Melanie Colavito, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Information on how to join is available here:

https://accap.uaf.edu/Assessment_AFSC?

Abstact:
The Alaska Fire Science Consortium (AFSC) is a boundary organization that works across the science-management interface to enhance the role that scientific information plays in decision-making for fire management in Alaska. We conducted a case study of AFSC to examine how they facilitate the delivery, development, and application of climate and related information and to determine the outcomes of their work. Specifically, this talk will outline the evolution of AFSC to examine how the activities they use to deliver science and facilitate new research development, their engagement with climate science information, and the outcomes of their work change over time.

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Northwest Boreal LCC Anthropogenic Footprint Maps Available

The dataset brings together data from several sources across Alaska and Canada. Map by ACCS.

Understanding the current, and historical, extent of human development is an important component to effectively managing ecosystems. The Alaska Center for Conservation Science at the University of Alaska Anchorage, in partnership with the Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative, embarked on a project to map and quantify the human footprint across interior Alaska and northwestern Canada and are happy to share this new information.

The maps and data are now available here:

http://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/landscape-ecology/northwest-boreal-anthropogenic-footprint/

A webinar will be held on October 4th to present the data and process. Details on how to join are available here:
http://nwblcc.org/?p=2436

The goal was to build a seamless dataset that spanned state, provincial and territorial boundaries to represent an initial look at intactness in the boreal ecosystems of western Canada and Alaska. This builds off work done by Ducks Unlimited Canada to bring together information from the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and British Columbia.

The data are available at the ACCS website.


Habitat loss and fragmentation are the leading causes of species loss globally, and although Alaska is thought to be 95% intact (Trammell and Aisu 2015), the location and intensity can have important impacts on local and regional resources. However, a detailed, comprehensive dataset showing human development has yet to be created for the state of Alaska. We expect these datasets can inform numerous resource and land managers decisions including:

  • Choose where to initiate or continue biological, chemical, and ecological monitoring
  • Identify potential remediation sites that appear to have significant cumulative impacts
  • Inventory possible restoration locations for development projects requiring mitigation
  • Utilize footprint data for conservation planning.

We anticipate that these datasets will help guide scenario planning efforts within and beyond the boreal ecosystem of Alaska, the Yukon Territory, and parts of the Northwest Territories and British Columbia.

The team spent significant effort on developing a comprehensive dataset defining mining’s footprint across the region. Historically, mines have been depicted by point locations which do not convey their relative sizes or mining activity might be represented by claims polygons which overestimate their actual footprints. With the advent of statewide 2.5 meter ortho-imagery, ACCS embarked on project to digitize visible surface disturbance related to historic and current mining. Nearly 2000 source point locations were evaluated from the US Geologic Survey, British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, and the Yukon Department of Energy, Mines, and Resources.

The mining footprint dataset includes over 650 discrete polygons totaling 1200 square kilometers with a mean size of 1.8 sq kms. The measured mining footprints have been summarized at the watershed (USGS HUC10 – mean area 688 sq kms) scale across Alaska and summarized at the coarse scale, sub-sub drainage unit (mean area 16,000 sq kms) within Canada. This dataset could help inform decisions regarding natural resource monitoring, identifying potential mitigation/restoration sites, and for conservation planning at watershed scales.

Additional human footprint datasets include a comprehensive transportation layer incorporating roads, trails, rails, and airports across the NWB LCC as well as and energy layer and a developed landcover layer.

Project Details

WHAT: This project assembled datasets representing the past and present human footprint across the Northwest Boreal Landscape.

WHERE: Northwest Boreal LCC spans across almost 40% of Alaska, 90% of the Yukon, 20% of British Columbia, and 7% of the NWT.

WHO: Alaska Center for Conservation Science staff gather data from federal, state, local, tribal, and non-governmental agencies. Duck Unlimited Canada contributed Candian datasets.

DATA CITATION: Geist, M., M. Aisu , P. Lema & E. J. Trammell. 2017. Spatial estimates of surface mining footprints in northwest boreal ecoregions of Alaska and Canada.

DATA CONTACT: If you have updated data and would like to incorporate your information into this footprint, please contact Marcus Geist at mageist (at) alaska.edu or 907-786-6325.

WHY: The Alaska Climate Science Center and the Northwest Boreal LCC expressed a need for landscape scale datasets which can be used for habitat modeling, connectivity evaluations, and a means to more fully measure cumulative impacts.

WHEN: The project began in 2014 with data updates through 2017.

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2017 Fall Alaska Fire Science Workshop to be held October 10

The Alaska Fire Science Consortium will host a workshop October 10, 2017.

In association with the Alaska Interagency Fall Fire Review, the Alaska Fire Science Consortium will host a half-day workshop on October 10, 2017. Topics include economic and ecological effects of fuel treatments, exploring future fire scenarios, tundra fire, and seasonal forecasting.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
1300-1700 AKDT
Alaska Fire Service Training Rooms, BLM – Alaska Fire Service facilities on Fort Wainwright.

Visit http://goo.gl/maps/XTgLY for a map and directions. Address: Bureau of Land Management – Alaska Fire Service, 1541 Gaffney Road, Fort Wainwright, AK 99706

Please contact AFSC coordinator Alison York ayork [at] alaska.edu for more information. Details are available here:

https://www.frames.gov/partner-sites/afsc/events/?utm_source=Alaska+Fire+Science+Consortium&utm_campaign=00e83e91ff-Fall+2017+Fire+Science+Workshop&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f71e8dfb48-00e83e91ff-136258021

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Webinar – Understanding Environmental Change in the Yukon River Basin through the Indigenous Observation Network and Citizen Science

Ryan Toohey, USGS Alaska Climate Science Center

Tuesday, September 19; 12 -1 PM Alaska Time

The Yukon River Basin (YRB), underlain by discontinuous permafrost, has experienced a warming climate over the last century that has altered air temperature, precipitation, and permafrost. A collaborative effort between the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Indigenous Observation Network (ION) has developed two projects that focus on water quality and permafrost research. More than 300 community environmental technicians have been trained to participate in ION by effectively monitoring and investigating their local environments with global implications. These local observations, obtained over the past decade, have contributed to the global understanding of climate change and ultimately its impacts on Alaska Native Villages. Combined with historical data from the USGS, the ION database now covers over 30 years of historical water quality data in key locations. Trend analysis of this database suggests increased active layer expansion, weathering and sulfide oxidation due to permafrost degradation throughout the YRB. Changing geochemistry of the YRB may have important implications for the carbon cycle, aquatic ecosystems, and contaminant transport. With predicted environmental changes, the efforts of ION and the integration of Indigenous knowledge will become critical to assess, mitigate and adapt to changing local environments.

Join us

In Anchorage:
US Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Office
1011 E Tudor Rd., Anchorage Alaska
Office of Science Applications Confence Rm

In Fairbanks:
US Fish and Wildlife Service Field Office
101 12th Ave.
Fairbanks Alaska
Refuges Conference Room

Remote connection:
Call-in number: 1-866-755-3168
Access code: 402 119 14

Click here to access webinar 
Meeting number: 745 762 485
Meeting password: ZypXQz4@

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