Conservation Coaches Network Open Standards Training Scheduled

Conservation Coaches Network has scheduled training for May 2017.

Conservation Coaches Network has scheduled training for May 2017.

A Conservation Coaches Network Training is scheduled from May 21 to May 26 in Ashland, Oregon at Buckhorn Springs Retreat Center.

The next CCNet coach training in North America after this one will be in late January 2018, at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV.

This training is intended to train conservation coaches who are already familiar with the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation. This is a not basic Open Standards course.

Cost
The cost for the Oregon coach training is approximately $850 per person, double occupancy. This price covers the cost of the meeting rooms, your lodging & food during the training, and covers the expenses (but not salaries) of the organizer and three coach trainers.

Travel
You would be responsible for your own travel costs to and from the venue.The most convenient airport for the Oregon training is Medford, OR.

Registration
If you are interested in registering for one of the trainings, please review the following instructions.

Please email Theresa Jensen (tjensen@mediate.com), copying John Morrison (john.morrison@wwfus.org), and please put “CCNet Training” in the subject line for a registration form.

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2017 Polar Geospatial Center Boot Camp Accepting Applications

A digital elevation model rendering of the Kuparuk River Watershed in Alaska’s Arctic. Image via Polar Geospatial Center.

The 2017 Polar Geospatial Center Boot Camp, an intensive, four-day geospatial workshop is accepting applications. This year’s event will take place from August 7th – 10th on the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota.

The workshop focuses on applications of commercial satellite imagery for polar science. Instructor-led short courses include Discovering Geospatial Data at the Poles, DEM Extraction from Stereoscopic Imagery, Georeferencing Maps and Aerial Imagery, and more. The PGC Boot Camp also hosts visiting expert speakers and offers dedicated project work time for one-on-one support from PGC staff.

Visit the Polar Boot Camp website for details. Application closes June 14th, 2017!

Prerequisites
Proficiency with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a prerequisite for admission to the workshop.

Course Fees
The non-refundable participation fee for this course is $150.

Accommodation
We have reserved a block of single-occupancy rooms in an on-campus dormitory at a rate of $48.65/night.

Timeline

Application deadline: June 14, 2017

Notification of acceptance: June 21, 2017

Course fee due: July 21, 2017

Workshop begins: August 7, 2017

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Job opening: Program Vegetation Ecologist – University of Alaska Anchorage

Alaska Center for Conservation Science is hiring a Plant Ecologist to manage the Vegetation Ecology Program and to serve as PI on several extramurally-funded projects related to assessing and monitoring vegetation in arctic and boreal Alaska.

Alaska Center for Conservation Science (ACCS) is a center for research, education, and scholarship at UAA that is committed to providing the public, industry, and agency partners with information to facilitate effective biological conservation and management of the state’s natural resources. Our faculty and staff conduct basic and applied research, serve a wide range of data to the public, offer professional services, and provide educational opportunities. http://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/

At ACCS this position will manage the Vegetation Ecology Program and serve as PI on several extramurally­funded projects. The Vegetation Ecology Program assesses the distribution, status, and trend of vegetation types across Alaska. This includes writing ecological description, classification, mapping, and evaluation of vegetation types ranging from community-scale plant associations to landscape-scale biophysical settings. Some of the ongoing projects include identifying ecosystems and plant associations of conservation concern, delineating plant associations/assemblages, landcover mapping, arctic and boreal vegetation monitoring, and vegetation classification (specifically the crafting of the mid- and lower-level vegetation units of the National Vegetation Classification as they apply to arctic and boreal Alaska).

More information.

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National Invasive Species Week – Alaska Resources

Invasive species pose a risk to places like Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska’s interior. Photo by USFWS.

National Invasive Species Week runs from February 27 to March 3, 2017. There are several resources in Alaska to learn more about invasive species and ways to prevent their introduction and spread.

1. Alaska Department of Fish and Game Invasive Species website for reporting vertebrates.

2. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Invasive Species website for reporting plants.

3. UAA’s Alaska Exotic Plants Information Clearinghouse (AKEPIC) – includes a database and mapping application that provide geospatial information for non-native plant species.

4. USFWS’s website for Ecological Risk Screening Summaries of invasive species – includes species background and habitat suitability modeling results for aquatic invasive species in the lower 48.

Thanks to Aaron Martin at USFWS Fisheries and Ecological Services for links to online resources.

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Alaska Wildfire Costs Projected to Grow this Century

The costs to fight fires in Alaska are expected to grow in the coming decades, according to new research.

The costs to fight fires in Alaska are expected to grow in the coming decades, according to new research.

Wildfires in Alaska and Canada cost millions of dollars to homeowners, businesses, and local and national governments. Those costs are expected to rise with a warming northern climate, according to new research that utilizes the ALFRESCO model. In an article that appears in the journal Climate Change, researchers leveraged federal fire fighting cost data with multiple greenhouse gas and fire scenarios.

“Total mean annual response costs reported here suggest that Alaska will face a continued and increasing financial burden from wildfires. A similar trend was reported recently for Canada, where a rise in projected area burned resulted in higher suppression costs under RCP8.5 relative to RCP2.6, a lower emission scenario than RCP4.5 (Hope et al. 2016). An increase in wildfire response costs have also been observed in Canada since the 1970s and are expected to continue to grow as a result of climate change and societal factors (Stocks and Martell 2016).”

You can read the full article here.

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Arctic Data Center Call for Proposals for Synthesis Working Group

The Arctic Data Center is announcing a call for Synthesis Working Group Proposals.

To promote the analysis and synthesis of Arctic data and to inform ongoing development of the data repository, the Arctic Data Center is soliciting requests for proposals for a Synthesis Working Group, with research to begin by August 2017. Funding is available for one Working Group to host two meetings at the Arctic Data Center in Santa Barbara, California, of approximately 15 participants each, over an anticipated 1-1.5 year period.

Proposals must focus on Arctic-related research issues, and primarily (but not necessarily exclusively) involve the analysis and synthesis of data contained within the Arctic Data Center Repository. Proposals will be reviewed by the Arctic Data Center’s Science Advisory Board for intellectual merit and broader impacts, and consideration will also be made as to the availability and sources of data needed by the project, as well as how the project will serve to evaluate and inform future directions for the Arctic Data Center’s services.

Timeline
February 16, 2017 – Call for proposals opens
April 26, 2017 – Call for proposals closes
June 2017 – Accepted proposal announced
August 2017 – Working Group research begins

Submitting a Proposal
Principal Investigators are encouraged to contact proposals@arcticdata.io to briefly discuss ideas before submitting proposals
Review important documents about submission and budgeting on the Arctic Data Center proposals page

Proposals can be up to a maximum of 2000 words
Submit proposals to proposals@arcticdata.io by April 26, 2017

The NSF-funded Arctic Data Center, founded in March 2016, is operated and led by NCEAS in partnership with NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and DataONE. The long-term Arctic Data Center repository allows for the preservation and sharing of data spanning many disciplines from the Arctic, now and into the future.

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Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program Funding Opportunity

The Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (FRTEP) funds Extension programs on American Indian Reservations and Tribal jurisdictions that address the unique needs and problems of American Indian Tribal Nations.

The USDA – National Institute of Food and Agriculture Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program is announcing a funding opportunity. The Federally-Recognized Tribes Extension Program (FRTEP) funds Extension programs on American Indian Reservations and Tribal jurisdictions that address the unique needs and problems of American Indian Tribal Nations. FRTEP is the link to building Indian community capacity through 4-H and tribal youth development, agriculture and natural resource management, and entrepreneurship and business development. This competitive grant program seeks to provide education and research-based knowledge to those who might not otherwise receive it.

General Information

FRTEP is a non-formal, knowledge-based educational program steeped in the philosophy established in the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. Outreach is conducted by Extension Educators of 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Institutions who live and work in Indian communities alongside tribal government officials and often with 1994 Land Grant Extension personnel.

Funding priorities

FRTEP programs are developed through local needs and objectives, reaching an underserved audience often overlooked by broader Extension efforts. FRTEP is often the key to leveraging additional development resources to reach those communities and individuals in most need.

The priority areas of the FRTEP Program:

Tribal Youth and 4-H
Indian farmer and rancher productivity and management
Indian Community development around economic and workforce enhancement
Indigenous food systems for food security, food safety and obesity reduction
Natural resource conservation and bio-energy development
Adaptation to climate change
American Indian cultural and linguistic preservation
Eligibility

Applications may be submitted by 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Institutions.

The awards process

FRTEP is a competitive, four-year continuation grant opportunity. Awards will be made through a competitive, peer-reviewed process administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). Award amounts will vary and are contingent upon annual Congressional Appropriations.

The RFA will be posted online as soon as it’s available. All applications for funding must be submitted electronically through www.Grants.gov (link is external).

Reviewers from universities, government, community-based organizations, for-profit and non-profit organizations and the farming community will provide peer assessment as well as recommend applications for funding.

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Yukon Community Adaptation Research in Whitehorse Daily Star

The Whitehorse Daily Star recently covered a discussion with Yukon researchers.

New research from the Northern Climate ExChange, funded by Norwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative explores factors that inhibit or facilitate climate research uptake by communities. A recent article in the Whitehorse Daily Star discusses the research, which identifies important considerations for communities, researchers, and planners for future work.

Researcher Meagan Grabowski, with supervision and training from Dr. Doug Clark (University of Saskatchewan), reviewed five plans written in the Yukon over the past decade and conducted interviews focusing on the Dawson Climate Change Adaptation plan.

The report outlines several barriers to incorporating climate research in the plans: a perception of climate change research, relevance and accessibility of research, communication, educational history, and human chemistry. The report does not evaluate plan implementation or effectiveness, but focused on the mechanisms of research uptake. A full report will be posted at nwblcc.org soon.

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Alaska Salmon Fellow Accepting Applications

Steve Joseph cuts salmon at fish camp. Photo by USFWS.

The Alaska Humanities Forum is now accepting applications and nominations for the Alaska Salmon Fellows program. Applications are due February 28, 2017.

This new program will facilitate demanding conversations about salmon issues among leaders from a cross section of salmon policy, management, industry, activism, research, and cultural sectors. A diverse cohort of leaders from across the state, spanning sectors and with varied connections to salmon, will be selected by April for an 18-month program beginning in May, 2017.

Fellows will receive individual awards of $10,000, take part in a series of gatherings with the cohort, and develop innovative initiatives to promote a strong future for Alaska’s salmon and people. Funding will be available to advance the initiatives and cover costs of travel, lodging, and food.

The Alaska Salmon Fellows serves as a:

Pathway for new and stronger connections across the diverse sectors that have a key stake in the future of Alaska’s salmon.

Network to share lessons and deepen understanding of differing perspectives among the Fellows, and through them, other stakeholders.

System of Influence, sparking new relationships and advancing tangible opportunities to inspire action on key issues and challenges.

Get more information, nominate a fellow, or apply online by Feb. 28 at akhf.org/alaska-salmon-fellows.

Join us at our open house and/or webinar events Feb. 7 and 8, and follow us on Facebook or Twitter #AKSalmonFellows.

Thank you for your consideration, and please share this information and opportunity with your networks. Contact the Forum with any questions.

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Yukon River Research Featured in ADN

Jay Hootch (former employee of Yupitt of Andreafski) drilling to be able to take winter chemistry samples for a permafrost study in the Yukon River basin to help shed light on how permafrost loss is causing cascading ecological changes. Video still from Ryan Toohey, USGS.

New research that explores how the Yukon River basin is experiencing chemical changes due to melting permafrost was featured recently in the Alaska Dispatch News.

Led by Alaska Climate Science Center/USGS scientist Ryan Toohey, a NWB LCC collaborator, the study used more than 30 years of measurements from the upper and lower river to track changes in chemistry. ADN’s Yereth Rosen writes:

Long-term monitoring reveals that levels of calcium, sodium, phosphorus, magnesium and sulfates are increasing in the river’s waters, according to a new study led by the USGS. That is evidence of widespread permafrost loss, which has allowed water to flow freely through thawed, mineral-rich soils and carry some of those minerals into the river.

The results indicate a profound transformation in the Yukon River basin, an area twice the size of California and a major contributor of water into the Arctic marine system, said the lead author of the study, which was published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, a publication of the American Geophysical Union.

According to USGS, the study was a collaborative effort between “USGS, the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, the Pilot Station Traditional Council and the Indigenous Observation Network funded by these organizations and the Administration for Native Americans and the National Science Foundation.”

NWB LCC collaborate, Edda Mutter, science director of the Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council, was a co-author on the paper.

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