Peninsular Florida LCC is Hiring a GIS Coordinator

PFLCC LogoCloses 7/25/2016

Primary Duties:

  • Provide GIS support for existing LCC projects including the development and maintenance of a web-based spatial data viewer and conservation planning atlas, as well as other evolving LCC efforts.
  • Perform spatially explicit GIS analyses to identify lands important to the long-term conservation of fish and wildlife resources and use the results to assist in refining existing natural resource priorities and conservation targets.
  • Contribute to maintenance and refinement of Critical Lands and Water Identification Project and related data layers.
  • Assist in data preparation, maintenance, and delivery via multiple methods – web based mapping applications, images, powerpoint presentations, and reports.  Prepare FGDC metadata.  Completion of project reports and assist in preparation of annual reports.  Review and provide comments on project deliverables and reports.
  • Participate in coordination of scientific activities within the PFLCC and adjacent south east LCCs to ensure that the science goals and objectives of the PFLCC are met.

Job listing:

https://jobs.myflorida.com/ viewjob.html?optlink-view= view-909442&ERFormID= newjoblist&ERFormCode=any

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Camped on an island on the Tanana River, Alaska Native elders and scientists discuss the way forward in a changing north

newsminerA group of Alaska Native elders and scientists recently gathered to discuss the path forward for their communities as climate change brings about new and sometimes unexpected changes.

As Diana Campbell writes in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, the Signs of the Land Camp II provided a place for sharing information and planning for the future.

“The Gwich’in people also spoke of this time of warming, said elder Trimble Gilbert, the Second Traditional Chief of the Athabascans, who attended the meeting. People will see strange wildlife and plants on the land, they said. Traditional foods will disappear. Others in the circle — Inupiat, Yupik and other tribes — said their elders had the same tale.”

Read the full article at the News-Miner.

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Save the Date: October 21st, 2016 – Earth to Sky Returns to Alaska for this One-Day Event

Morris_Thompson_centerWhat’s currently going on with climate change in Alaska, and how do we best engage audiences on climate issues?

If you’ve been wondering about these and similar questions, save-the-date – October 21st, and join the Earth to Sky interagency partnership for an in-person mini-course in Fairbanks, with our partners from NASA, National Park Service, and many other agencies and organizations.

  • Meet with world-class scientists and communicators and explore the best practices and latest insights into understanding/responding to changing climate
  • Hear about the latest research being conducted by the NASA Arctic Boreal and Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Campaign in Canada and Alaska
  • Learn tips on climate communication from experienced Earth to Sky alumni
  • Explore new tools, including citizen science activities and stunning visual resources from NASA 
  • Discover useful online resources to help develop your understanding of and ability to communicate about climate
  • Become part of a statewide community of engaged educators, working on the best ways to communicate about climate with audiences, both on-site and virtually
  • Outline your own customized plan for presenting a climate program or designing a product for use at your work site

And best of all, learn how to stay connected to these scientists and communicators over time.  You’re not alone in your efforts – and here’s proof there’s lots of help available!

More information available here.

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Canadian Council on Ecological Areas (CCEA) National Workshop

CCAE LogoThe next CCEA national workshop, co-hosted by the Northwest Territories and Yukon, will be held in Yellowknife the week of October 24th 2016.  This timing will ensure our work supports the Pan-Canadian efforts towards a roadmap to achieving Canada’s contribution to Aichi Target 11, while also incorporating the results of the World Conservation Congress that the CCEA is participating in.

This workshop will build on the previous workshop in Fredericton, namely achieving the qualitative aspects of Aichi Target 11. It will focus on the two aspects of the target that have been lesser studied in Canada: the need for equitable management and connectivity of protected areas.

If you are interested in attending or getting more information, please contact Jessica Elliot, MEDs, Parks Planner for Environment Yukon directly to be added to their general circulation list.

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Reminder – Abstract Deadline: June 15 ~ 14th International Circumpolar Remote Sensing Symposium

Circumpolar Remote Sensing SymposiumThe Symposium is September 12-16, 2016 in Homer Alaska.

The symposium provides a forum for the exchange of current applied international research, the presentation of new technology, and the advancement of national and international cooperation in the circumpolar regions of the world.

The theme of the 14th ICRSS symposium in Homer, Alaska, is Remote Sensing applications for addressing emerging research questions and management needs in polar regions. This symposium is unique in that it deals specifically with remote sensing applications in Arctic and Antarctic environments and how the broad suite of remotely sensed information and remote sensing techniques can provide much needed information for rapidly changing polar regions.

More information.

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Webinar (CBI) – Geomorphic & Climatic Controls on Water Temperature & Streambed Scour, Copper R. Delta, AK

Conservation Biology Institute Webinar

June 9, 10 AM PST

Presenter:  Luca A. Adelfio, Oregon State University Department of Water Resources

Climatic changes are projected to impact Pacific Salmon egg incubation by increasing the magnitude and frequency of winter floods and by raising water temperatures. More powerful and more frequent winter floods could reduce the survival of salmon eggs by increasing streambed scour. Projected increases in water temperature may accelerate embryo development, impacting juvenile viability.Read more.

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Webinar — Using Dall Sheep as Bellwethers of Alpine Ecosystem Health

Photo: FWS (Tetlin NWR)

Photo: FWS (Tetlin NWR)

June 14th, 2016, 10-11 AM ADT

Presenter: Laura Prugh, Assistant Professor of Quantitative Wildlife Sciences, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, and PI for NASA Above Project

Abstract:
Mountain ranges harbor a unique suite of species and function as the world’s water towers, but little is known about climate change impacts in alpine ecosystems. Dall sheep are likely bellwethers of alpine ecosystem health in Alaska and northwestern Canada, and signs are pointing towards increasing ailment. Declines in Dall sheep populations throughout their range have led to emergency harvest closures and sparked widespread concern about the future of this iconic northern species. In this webinar, I will introduce an ambitious new study that seeks to understand factors affecting Dall sheep populations across their global range. Our project, which is part of NASA’s Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), will study how changes in vegetation and snow properties affect recruitment, survival, and movements of Dall sheep.

To join the meeting:
https://gsfc610.adobeconnect.com/etsakjune14/

Audio Conference Number(s):
Toll-free line: 1-844-467-6272
Passcode is 138924#

We ask participants to join the audio using this toll-free conference line, to avoid difficulties with voice-over-internet-protocol (VOIP) transmissions, and to encourage more dialogue with our presenter.

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New report calculates Alaska’s greenhouse gas potential

Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of Alaska1 June 2016

FAIRBANKS, Alaska —
Plant growth in Alaska should store as much carbon as the state loses to wildfire and thawing permafrost through 2100, a new analysis predicts.

Scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service did the analysis to help understand the changing climate.

The scientists found that Alaska’s ecosystems currently capture as much carbon as they lose to the atmosphere.

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Looking Beyond Borders and Planning for Change in Alaska

The BSWI RMP sets a land use vision for a large area of central and western Alaska.Map from BLM.

The BSWI RMP sets a land use vision for a large area of central and western Alaska.Map from BLM.

Alaskans are creating the first comprehensive land use plan for a Michigan-sized area of forest, tundra, and salmon-producing rivers. Sandwiched between the vast forested heart of the state and the Bering Sea coast, the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Bering Sea Western Interior (BSWI) Resource Management Plan sets high level goals for the next two decades.

In Alaska, generally speaking, the National Park Service manages mountainous lands, Fish and Wildlife Service handles lowlands and swamps, while the Bureau of Land Management and the state of Alaska manage middle uplands. BLM-managed lands literally link together Alaska’s protected lands and carry a multi-use mandate. Of the 62.3 million acres in the planning area, BLM manages 13.4 million strategically-positioned acres.

The agency manages a portion of the study area, but according to Jorjena Barringer, Project Manager for the Bureau of Land Management’s for Bering Sea Western Interior (BSWI) Resource Management Plan, it makes sense to look past boundary lines.

“We need to take into consideration what is occurring outside of the BLM-managed public lands so that we can anticipate what might happen across a landscape, across different landownerships, and take that into conservation in our planning,” said Barringer. “We have to think about being consistent with land owners, for instance, National Wildlife Refuges, Native Corporation lands, or state lands.”
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New Study Encourages Inclusion of Adaptive Capacity when Assessing Vulnerability

Calling pika_ShanaWeberPhD_EastHumboldtRange_NV(This USGS article originally appeared here)

Assessing the vulnerability of wildlife species to a changing climate is critical for understanding what adaptation actions need to be taken to minimize negative impacts. The ability of species to adapt to the impacts of climate change (i.e., their adaptive capacity) is an important factor to consider when assessing vulnerability. For example, organisms can possess traits that allow them to move to areas of favorable habitat or change their phenotypes (observable characteristics) in response to changing environmental conditions. Additionally, an organism’s traits can adapt to a changing external environment over multiple generations through evolutionary processes. Adaptive capacity accounts for coping mechanisms such as changes in behavior, movements including shifts in geographical range and distribution, as well as genetic evolution to adjust to environmental or ecological stressors.

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